Spinal Decompression Therapy

Spinal Decompression Therapy at Venturis

 

Spinal decompression therapy is a nonsurgical innovative treatment option for people with mild to moderate back pain. Regardless of the cause of back pain, spinal decompression therapy is often used in conjunction with other treatment modalities.

 



What causes of back pain are treated with spinal decompression?

Spinal decompression therapy is a nonsurgical innovative treatment option for people with mild to moderate back pain. Regardless of the cause of back pain, spinal decompression therapy is often used in conjunction with other treatment modalities.

What causes of back pain are treated with spinal decompression?

Spinal decompression therapy is used for people with pain related to:

  • Bulging disc
  • Herniated disc
  • Degenerative disc disease
  • Spinal stenosis
  • Sciatica
  • Lumbar radiculopathy

What symptoms are treated using spinal decompression?

Most patients chosen for spinal decompression therapy have back pain. Severe pain is not treated using this measure. In addition, symptoms improved involve nerve compression syndromes, such as lumbar radiculopathy and sciatic nerve irritation. These problems can cause leg numbness, weakness, tingling, and burning pain.

How does spinal decompression therapy work?

Spinal decompression is used to realign the spine components for the purpose of relieving pressure on a pinched nerve. Nerve compression causes chronic pain and radiculopathy symptoms (leg weakness, numbness, and tingling). By using a special form of traction, spinal decompression therapy will increase circulation to the injured or damaged disc, which allows it to heal naturally. Once disc pressure is alleviated, the decompression technique can reduce compression of spinal roots.

Who is a candidate for spinal decompression therapy?

Anyone who is experiencing chronic back pain could benefit from spinal decompression therapy. The treatment is made for those with disc-related pain. You should not have the treatment if you have advanced age, osteoporosis, are pregnant, have an active fracture, have abdominal aortic aneurysms, have a current injury to the neck or back, or have severe, debilitating pain. Individuals who have experience pain for greater than six months are often considered for spinal decompression.

What can I expect in the physician consultation visit?

You will first meet with our Venturis pain management specialist to be evaluated. The doctor will conduct a comprehensive physical examination, ask questions about your symptoms, and take a detailed medical history. The doctor will screen you to see if you are a candidate for spinal decompression therapy before scheduling it. After the doctor reviews the pros and cons of the procedure, he will have you sign a consent form.

How is spinal decompression therapy done?

Spinal decompression therapy is done in the physician’s office. You will remain clothed and lie on a procedure table. Your pelvis and trunk region is strapped with a special device. The table is computer-controlled, so no needles are involved. The doctor will table segments are moved slowly to decompress the targeted discs. Sometimes, decompression therapy is used along with electrotherapy, massage, ultrasound therapy, or chiropractic adjustments.

How many therapy sessions will I need?

The spinal decompression treatment session lasts for around 45 minutes. The doctor will recommend a series of treatments. A typical program involves 1-2 sessions each week for 4-6 weeks.

Does spinal decompression therapy work?

In a study involving people with ruptured intervertebral discs, the efficacy rate of spinal decompression was 86%. Patients reported excellent or good improvement following the therapy. Regarding sciatica and back pain, 75% said they had pain relief. In another study involving 20 patients, researchers found that decompression offered 90% efficacy for reduction of subligamentous nucleus herniation. Finally, results from 219 patients with back pain found that 92% showed improvement soon after therapy, and 89% had pain relief 3 months following decompression therapy.

Resources

Eyerman, Edward MD. Simple pelvic traction gives inconsistent relief to herniated lumbar disc sufferers. Journal of Neuroimaging. Paper presented to the American Society of Neuroimaging, Orlando, Florida 2-26-98.

 

Gionis T & Groteke E (2003). Surgical Alternatives: Spinal Decompression. Orthopedic Technology Review, 6 (5).

 

Shealy CN & Borgmeyer V (1997). Decompression, Reduction, and Stabilization of the Lumbar Spine: A Cost-Effective Treatment for Lumbosacral Pain. American Journal of Pain Management, 7(2).

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